Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.
Regional Medical Center
1155 Mill St

Children's Hospital
1155 Mill St

Rehabilitation Hospital
1495 Mill St

South Meadows Medical Center
10101 Double R Blvd

Skilled Nursing
1835 Oddie Blvd

Carson Valley Medical Center
1107 HWY 395
Center for Advanced Medicine B
1500 E 2nd St

Center for Advanced Medicine C
75 Pringle Way

Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
1155 Mill St

Institute for Cancer
1155 Mill St
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.
Regional Medical Center
1155 Mill St

Children's Hospital
1155 Mill St

Rehabilitation Hospital
1495 Mill St

South Meadows Medical Center
10101 Double R Blvd

Skilled Nursing
1835 Oddie Blvd

Carson Valley Medical Center
1107 HWY 395
Center for Advanced Medicine B
1500 E 2nd St

Center for Advanced Medicine C
75 Pringle Way

Institute for Heart & Vascular Health
1155 Mill St

Institute for Cancer
1155 Mill St
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Regional Medical Center

1155 Mill St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-4100


Renown Regional Medical Center
1155 Mill St, Reno, NV 89502
Renown Health serves a 17-county region with a total population in excess of 750,000. Our facilities include two medical centers, a rehabilitation hospital, a skilled nursing facility, numerous medical group and urgent care facilities, and the region's most trusted health insurance provider, Hometown Health. 775-982-5000

Renown Children's Hospital

1155 Mill St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-KIDS (5437)

Renown Children's Hospital
1155 Mill St, Reno, NV 89502
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Rehabilitation Hospital

1495 Mill St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-3500


Renown Rebabilitation Hospital - 1495 Mill St
1495 Mill St, Reno, NV 89502
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown South Meadows
Medical Center

10101 Double R Blvd Reno, NV 89521
775-982-7000


Renown South Meadows - 10101 Double R Blvd
10101 Double R Blvd, Reno, NV 89521
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Carson Valley Medical Center

1107 Hwy 395 Gardnerville, NV 89410
775-782-1550


Carson Valley Medical Center - 1107 Highway 395
1107 Highway 395, Gardnerville, NV 89410
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Skilled Nursing

1835 Oddie Blvd Sparks, NV 89431
775-982-3232


Renown Skilled Nursing - 1835 Oddie Blvd
1835 Oddie Boulevard, Sparks, NV 89431
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Health Urgent Care

775-982-5000

Renown Health Urgent Care
9 convenient locations
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.
Renown Lab Services offers convenient access to complete your lab work with 10 locations close to your home or work. For your convenience, many of the locations are located inside or next to Renown hospitals and medical groups. Extended and Saturday hours are available at some locations.
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Center for Advanced Medicine B at Renown Regional

1500 E 2nd St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-4100


Center for Advanced Medicine B - 1500 E. 2nd St
1500 E. 2nd St., Reno, NV 89502
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Center for Advanced Medicine C at Renown Regional

75 Pringle Way Reno, NV 89502
775-982-4100


Center for Advanced Medicine C - 75 Pringle Way
75 Pringle Way, Reno, NV 89502
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Institute Heart & Vascular Health

1155 Mill St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-7888


Institute for Heart & Vascular Health - 1155 Mill St
1155 Mill St, Reno, NV 89502
Based in Reno, Nevada, Renown Health continues to be the regional healthcare leader, serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. Renown is Reno’s only locally owned, not-for-profit health network offering more services than all other local healthcare networks combined.

Renown Institute for Cancer

1155 Mill St Reno, NV 89502
775-982-5638


Renown Institute for Cancer - 1155 Mill St
1155 Mill St, Reno, NV 89502
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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions about Knee Replacements

 

What is arthritis and why does my knee hurt?

In the knee joint there is a layer of smooth cartilage on the lower end of the femur (thighbone), the upper end of the tibia (shinbone) and the undersurface of the patella (kneecap). This cartilage serves as a cushion and allows for smooth motion of the knee. Arthritis is a wearing away of the smooth cartilage. Eventually, the cartilage wears down to bone. Rubbing of bone against bone causes pain, discomfort, swelling and stiffness.

What is a total knee replacement?

A total knee replacement is essentially a cartilage replacement with an artificial joint, or knee prosthesis. The knee itself is not replaced, as is commonly thought, but rather an artificial substitute for the cartilage is inserted on the end of the bones. With new smooth surfaces, the bones can once again glide freely. A knee prosthesis does have limitations, but it can allow you to walk and move with greater comfort.

How successful is knee replacement?

Currently, over 500,000 Americans undergo joint replacement surgery each year. This technique provides pain relief in 90-95% of patients. Most patients who have suffered from stiff or painful knees prior to surgery will regain near normal motion, and nearly all will have relief of discomfort and significantly increased activity and mobility.

Who should have a knee replacement?

When severe pain limits your everyday activities such as walking, going up and down stairs and getting in and out of chairs, you may want to consider knee replacement surgery. Other reasons you may benefit from surgery are if you have moderate or severe knee pain while resting, swelling of the knee that does not improve with rest or medication, bowing in or out of your knee, or the inability to bend and straighten your knee.

Is there an alternative to replacement?

Knee replacement surgery may be recommended after careful diagnosis of your joint problem. Other treatment options include medications, injections, physical therapy or other types of surgery.

What are the major risks?

Most surgeries are successful without any complications. However, infection and blood clots are two rare but possible complications. To reduce the risk of infections, we use antibiotics and take special precautions in the operating room. To prevent blood clots from forming in your leg veins, your surgeon may prescribe one or more measures, such as a special support hose, inflatable leg coverings and blood thinners.

Should I exercise before surgery?

Yes, consult your surgeon about the exercises appropriate for you.

How long will I be in the hospital?

Most knee patients will be hospitalized for three to four days after their surgery. There are several goals that you must achieve before you will be able to leave the hospital.

Where will I go after discharge from the hospital?

Most patients are able to go home directly after discharge. Some patients may transfer to a sub-acute facility, where they will stay for 3-5 days. The case manager will help you with this decision and make the necessary arrangements. You should check with your insurance company to see if you have sub-acute rehab benefits.

Do you recommend any activity restrictions following this surgery?

Yes – we do not recommend high-impact activities, such as running, tennis, high impact aerobics, repetitive lifting exceeding 50 lbs., and basketball. Injury-prone sports such as downhill skiing and contact sports are also dangerous for the new joint.

What physical/recreational activities may I participate in after my recovery?

We encourage you to participate in low-impact activities such as walking, dancing, cycling, golf, hiking, swimming, bowling and gardening. Consult with your surgeon or therapist for their advice on how soon you can resume the activities you enjoy.

Frequently Asked Questions about Hip Replacements

What is arthritis and why does my hip hurt?

In the hip joint there is a layer of smooth cartilage that covers the ends of the thighbone, as well as the pelvis where it joins the thighbone. This cartilage serves as a cushion and allows for smooth motion of the hip. Arthritis is a wearing away of the smooth cartilage. Eventually, the cartilage wears down to bone. Rubbing of bone against bone causes pain, discomfort and stiffness.

What is a total hip replacement?

A total hip replacement is essentially a cartilage replacement with an artificial joint, or hip prosthesis. An artificial ball replaces the head of the thighbone, and an artificial cup replaces the worn socket. A stem is inserted into the bone for stability. These parts connect to create your new artificial hip. With new smooth surfaces, the bones can once again glide freely. A hip prosthesis does have limitations, but it can allow you to walk and move with greater comfort.

How successful is hip replacement?

Currently, over 250,000 Americans undergo hip replacement surgery each year. This technique provides pain relief in 90-95% of patients. Most patients who have suffered from stiff or painful hips prior to surgery will regain near normal motion, and nearly all will have relief of discomfort and significantly increased activity and mobility.

Who should have a hip replacement?

Hip replacement surgery may be considered when arthritis limits your everyday activities such as walking and bending, when pain continues while resting, or stiffness in your hip limits your ability to move or lift your leg.

Is there an alternative to replacement?

Hip replacement surgery may be recommended only after careful diagnosis of your joint problem. You may benefit from surgery only if you have little pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, you have harmful or unpleasant side effects from your hip medications, or other treatments such as physical therapy do not relieve hip pain.

What are the major risks?

Most surgeries are successful without any complications. However, infection and blood clots are two rare but possible complications. To reduce the risk of infections, we use antibiotics and take special precautions in the operating room. To prevent blood clots from forming in your leg veins, your surgeon may prescribe one or more measures, such as a special support hose, inflatable leg coverings and blood thinners.

Should I exercise before surgery?

Yes, consult your surgeon about the exercises appropriate for you.

How long will I be in the hospital?

Most hip patients will be hospitalized for three to four days after their surgery. There are several goals that you must achieve before you will be able to leave the hospital.

Where will I go after discharge from the hospital?

Most patients are able to go home directly after discharge. Some patients may transfer to a sub-acute facility, where they will stay for 3-5 days. The case manager will help you with this decision and make the necessary arrangements. You should check with your insurance company to see if you have sub-acute rehab benefits.

Do you recommend any activity restrictions following this surgery?

Yes – in the early stages of your recovery, you will have strict movement precautions. Once you have recovered, we do not recommend high-impact activities, such as running, tennis, high impact aerobics, repetitive lifting exceeding 50 lbs., and basketball. Injury-prone sports such as downhill skiing and contact sports are also dangerous for the new joint.

What physical/recreational activities may I participate in after my recovery?

We encourage you to participate in low-impact activities such as walking, dancing, cycling, golf, hiking, swimming, bowling and gardening. Consult with your surgeon or therapist for their advice on how soon you can resume the activities you enjoy.