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    • Women's Health

    Dr. Carilyn Hoffman's Guide to Menopause Medication & Relief

    Women undergo multiple hormonal changes throughout their lives, leading to different physical and emotional experiences. Dr. Carilyn Hoffman, at Renown Women's Health, explains these confusing life stages and helps decode menopause. Perimenopause: Transitioning Towards Menopause Defined as the time "around menopause," perimenopausal symptoms are caused by hormonal fluctuations that occur as the ovarian function declines. Levels of estrogen and progesterone decrease, and follicle stimulating hormone increases. These hormonal fluctuations may cause a range of symptoms including: Irregular or abnormal periods: Initially cycles intervals vary in length by greater than 7 days, then in later stages the interval increases to greater than 60 days between cycles Hot flashes and night sweats: This is the most common symptom and 50-82% of women will have vasomotor symptoms Mood swings and memory problems Anxiety or insomnia Heart palpitations Decreased libido and vaginal dryness Weight gain and thinning hair Increased risk of urinary tract infections Decreased bone density Menopause Menopause is defined as year without a menstrual cycle and marks the timeframe when the ovaries stop making estrogen. This signifies the end of the reproductive years. The average age of menopause is 51; however, the menopausal transition can last about 8 years. This means that women in their late 30’s and 40’s may start to have symptoms of perimenopause. The worst vasomotor symptoms are typically experienced at the one-year mark since the last period. Unfortunately, some women experience symptoms throughout the entire menopausal transition. Postmenopausal After 12 months without a menstrual cycle, a woman is confirmed to be postmenopausal. This is sometimes difficult to define, as women may have had procedures that cause menstrual suppression such as a uterine ablation or hysterectomy or they may still be on contraception. Sometimes, lab work may be recommended to help determine menopausal status. However, due to the broad time period that the menopausal transition occurs and the variations in normal hormone levels throughout a cycle, lab work is not always helpful. Dr. Hoffman explains the importance of thorough counseling for patients seeking to "check their hormone levels." She emphasizes that menopause is diagnosed clinically, focusing more on the individual's symptoms rather than lab values. This approach ensures that patients understand the implications of the test results and the treatment strategy. Menopause Medical Management Medical management of symptoms should be tailored to the individual’s concerns. Abnormal Bleeding: There are a range of medications, IUDs and procedures available if the main concern is irregular or prolonged menstrual bleeding during perimenopause.  Hot Flashes and Night Sweats: Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): HRT is currently the most effective method for relieving vasomotor symptoms. However, it's important to discuss potential risks with a healthcare provider, as HRT can increase your risk of blood clots and breast cancer. If improperly prescribed, it can also increase the risk of uterine cancer. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends the lowest dose for the shortest duration. Low-dose antidepressants: SSRIs/SSNIs may mitigate hot flashes and mood disorders for those who are not candidates or prefer to avoid HRT. Currently, only Paroxetine is FDA-approved for this use.  Fezolinetant: This is a newly FDA-approved non-hormonal medication that works at the brain's level to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gabapentin: This is an anticonvulsant medication that has been shown in several studies to be helpful for vasomotor symptoms, but it is not currently FDA-approved. Genitourinary Symptoms of Menopause:  Vaginal estrogen: Vaginal dryness and pain with intercourse due to thinning vaginal tissue is a common symptom of menopause. Vaginal estrogen is highly effective at decreasing these symptoms and has fewer side effects than systemic HRT. Ospemifene: This is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that is a non-hormonal FDA-approved medication for severe vaginal dryness. Natural Symptom Relief Strategies: Nutrition: Incorporate calcium, vitamin D, and high-quality protein to support bone health and muscle maintenance. There are limited studies on phytoestrogens (found in soy and tofu) and vasomotor symptoms. While the data doesn’t necessarily support that these phytoestrogens relieve symptoms, no detrimental effects were found and these tend to be high quality and healthy proteins. Exercise: Regular physical activity can ease menopausal symptoms and support weight management. Data doesn’t support that this reduces vasomotor symptoms, but it can be helpful in weight management and sleep quality. Beverage choices: Limiting alcohol and caffeine can help decrease the frequency of vasomotor symptoms and may also improve sleep quality. Alternative remedies: One study shows that Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture are effective at relieving vasomotor symptoms. There is not enough evidence to recommend Black Cohosh, and it is associated with liver toxicity in high doses. Studies don’t show that St. John’s Wart or Gingko Balboa are any better than placebo.  Always mention your alternative medical therapies to your provider as some do interact with other prescribed medications. By understanding and recognizing that the symptoms of menopause are real and treatable, women are empowered to manage this transition better and can maintain their well-being and quality of life. Please schedule an appointment with Renown Women’s Health if you’d like to discuss your menopause symptoms with a provider.

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    • Women's Health
    • Expert Advice

    What is an Ovarian Cyst, and How is it Treated?

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for an Emergency Room visit. The abdomen is an area that encompasses multiple organs and functions. So how would you know when the pain you are feeling is an ovarian cyst or something else, and when should you seek medical attention? Dr. Carilyn Hoffman, at Renown Women's Health, explains. Ovarian Function Defined Located on each side of the uterus, the ovaries are part of the female reproductive organs and produce eggs (ova), released during the menstrual cycle, allowing for fertilization and pregnancy. They also produce hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, which play an important role in female traits, bone health, cardiovascular health and pregnancy. Symptoms of an Ovarian Cyst Cysts are solid or fluid-filled masses. Ovarian cysts can be in the ovary or on its surface. When cysts are enlarged or rupture, they can create a dull ache or sharp pain below the belly button. Besides discomfort and pain, other symptoms of ovarian cysts may include bloating, fullness, pressure or heaviness. "Ovarian cysts are common; most are physiologic and will go away on their own. They are frequently found incidentally on ultrasound and are present in the middle of the menstrual cycle," says Dr. Hoffman. "However, if a woman experiences sudden and severe pelvic pain they should seek immediate medical attention. Sometimes ovarian cysts can become large and twist on themselves. This is called ovarian torsion and is a surgical emergency. Other times, cysts can rupture and bleed. This is called a hemorrhagic cyst and can also be a surgical emergency." Diagnosis and Treatment If an ovarian cyst is suspected, your doctor will perform a pelvic exam and order an ultrasound. There are certain ultrasound findings that suggest that the cyst is benign. There are other ultrasound findings that are concerning for cancer. Small simple cysts often resolve on their own, whereas solid or very large cysts may require surgery.

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    • Women's Health
    • Prevention and Wellness
    • Screening

    The Expanded Role of OBGYNs in Women's Healthcare

    Obstetrician-gynecologists (OBGYNs) see patients from menses (the monthly menstrual cycle that occurs as a part of the female reproductive system), pregnancy and childbirth through menopause and play a pivotal role in managing reproductive health and overall wellness. Dr. James Alexander with Renown Women's Health explains. "As experts in women's health, we are uniquely positioned to recognize subtle changes or symptoms that might indicate broader health issues. This comprehensive approach allows us to serve as a valuable first touchpoint for various health concerns." Preventive Screenings: A Proactive Approach One key aspect is an OBGYN's ability to recommend preventive screenings based on your symptoms, age, lifestyle and medical history. For instance, lipid screenings are critical for monitoring cholesterol levels, which can be a significant factor in women’s heart disease. An OBGYN keeps up with the current guidelines for routine screening as well as in women with risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or a family history of heart disease during your visit. By identifying risks and abnormal screening early, they can collaborate with you to implement lifestyle changes or treatments to reduce your risk of heart conditions. Schedule Your Screening Appointment Make an Appointment by Phone: 775-982-5000

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    • Cancer Care
    • Renown Health Foundation
    • Women's Health
    • Patient Story

    Celebrating Resilience: Raquel's Remarkable Journey Through Breast Cancer Treatment

    Raquel was 33 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was April 2023, when she found a lump in her breast and was referred to the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute. After comprehensive imaging, she was diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma, which is a type of breast cancer that begins in the milk-producing glands of the breast. Between June 2023 and January 2024, she received a total mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiation at Renown Health. “Breast cancer is uncommon in women under 40, but any woman with a mass or lump in her breast should have an exam by a physician and imaging at any age,” said Dr. Lee Schwartzberg. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 9% of all new cases of breast cancer in the U.S. are found in women younger than 45. “It was a pretty scary diagnosis, but I’ve been led by great people through the process,” she said. “They were so helpful and there for me throughout the chemo and radiation.” Raquel's journey through breast cancer treatment at the William N. Pennington Cancer Institute was marked by the exceptional care provided by the Renown Health team, including nurses, nurse navigators, therapists, support teams and providers. Among the dedicated professionals, Dr. Michelle Chu and Dr. Lee Schwartzberg played pivotal roles in Raquel's diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan. Their expertise, compassion and commitment to patient care left an indelible impact on Raquel's experience. Their thorough examination and comprehensive approach ensured that Racquel received the best possible care for her invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the care provided at Renown, Raquel greatly benefitted from being connected with a mentor by Dr. Chu. This mentor, Kayla, had undergone a similar diagnosis and treatment plan, and at the same age Raquel. They texted and called each other throughout Raquel’s treatment, providing additional support through a challenging time. As of January 2024, Raquel is done with her treatment and continues to see her care team for follow-up appointments. “I’m through the worst and ready to rebuild my life,” Raquel said. To help celebrate this milestone, Nevada Athletics invited Raquel to receive the game ball at a Nevada Men’s Basketball game. She was joined on the basketball court for this special recognition by her husband, Raul; mother, Arlene; and two daughters, Ryleigh and Rhiannon. Racquel's journey is not only a testament to her resilience but also a tribute to the invaluable contributions of Dr. Chu and Dr. Schwartzberg in guiding her towards triumph over breast cancer.

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    • Women's Health
    • Emergency Care

    Most Common Reasons Women Visit the ER

    If you or someone you know is experiencing a medical emergency, it's essential to seek immediate attention by calling 9-1-1 or visiting the ER for a thorough evaluation by a trained medical professional and timely intervention. Access to a convenient and trusted emergency room (ER) is critical to any person’s healthcare needs, including medical emergencies related to women’s health. We explored some common scenarios and warning signs prompting women to seek immediate medical attention with Aiden Gould, Board-Certified Emergency Physician at Renown Health. When your medical emergency can’t wait, Renown ER is here to provide you with the region’s leading emergency care to diagnose and treat your condition or illness.  Understanding Common Reasons Women Visit the Emergency Room Gynecological Emergencies: One of the most common reasons women may seek emergency care is due to gynecological emergencies such as severe pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding or complications related to pregnancy. These issues can be alarming and warrant immediate medical attention if the issue persists or is out of the ordinary for you.  Emotional and Physical Well-Being: For those facing diverse medical or mental health emergencies, seeking prompt assistance is crucial for a thorough assessment and safe, timely intervention. Renown ER teams are equipped with trained professionals who provide compassionate care for individuals seeking help in the following situations: Suicide risk assessment and intervention Substance abuse assessment Assault and trauma care Crisis support and intervention Resources for ongoing care and well-being support Severe Abdominal Pain: Unexplained and severe abdominal pain that is substantially different than what is normal for you is a symptom you should never ignore as it can indicate underlying issues. Warning signs of an acute medical situation include fever, vomiting or a rapid change in motor function and inability to move due to pain. Respiratory Distress: Difficulty breathing, persistent coughing and other respiratory issues can be especially concerning. Women with pre-existing respiratory conditions like asthma or those experiencing sudden respiratory distress should seek immediate care from a medical professional. Warning signs of respiratory distress may include a significant change in one’s breathing rate, changing of the skin color to blue, gray or paleness due to lack of oxygen, nose flaring and chest retractions. Cardiovascular Emergencies: Heart-related issues are not exclusive to men. Women can also experience cardiovascular emergencies that often go undiagnosed because symptoms differ from men. Symptoms like chest pain, extreme fatigue, vomiting or pain in the abdomen, shortness of breath or palpitations should be evaluated by an emergency medical professional as timely intervention is critical in such cases. Renown leads the region in cardiology care with our technological expertise and patient-centered approach. Our comprehensive team diagnoses heart disease and other cardiac conditions, offering personalized treatment plans.  Neurological Symptoms: Sudden and severe headaches, seizures or other neurological symptoms may prompt women to visit the ER if symptoms are extremely disorientating or debilitating. These symptoms could be indicative of various conditions from mild to severe, including strokes or neurological disorders that require prompt evaluation.  Renown Regional Medical Center is a Comprehensive Stroke Center, providing primary stroke care including evaluation, treatment and education to patients who arrive at a Renown facility with the signs and symptoms of a stroke. Compassionate Care in Times of Need At Renown Health, we understand that your time is valuable, especially in emergency situations. That's why we strive to provide patients with exceptional care, compassion and respect. Plan ahead and make informed decisions about seeking medical care by viewing your estimated triage wait time at a Renown ER.

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    • Women's Health
    • Prevention and Wellness

    Understanding the Reasons Behind Heavy Menstrual Cycles

    While menstrual cycles can be an annoying inconvenience for many women, heavy bleeding (menorrhagia) is not normal and can disrupt your life. A few days of heavy flow at the start of your period is usually nothing to worry about. However, if you’re frequently experiencing very heavy periods, you should discuss it with your gynecologist or primary care provider.  Dr. Megan Fish, an OB-GYN with Renown Women’s Health, discusses various reasons, evaluation and treatment methods when it comes to heavy menstrual cycles.  What is classified as heavy menstrual bleeding?  The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists considers heavy bleeding to be any of the following signs: Bleeding that lasts more than 7 days. Bleeding that soaks through one or more tampons or pads every hour for several hours in a row. Needing to wear more than one pad at a time to control menstrual flow. Needing to change pads or tampons during the night. Menstrual flow with blood clots that are as big as a quarter or larger. What are the most common reasons for heavier periods?  A variety of reasons why someone might have heavy periods. Fortunately, most of these problems are treatable. Because each woman's period is unique, only a doctor can definitively determine the cause of your heavy periods. Some of the most common issues that cause heavy periods include: Hormone imbalances such as anovulation, thyroid disease and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Structural abnormalities in your uterus such as polyps or fibroids.  Precancer and cancer such as uterine, cervical, vaginal, ovarian or endometrial hyperplasia.  Infections such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, endometritis or vaginitis. Other medical conditions such as liver disease, kidney disease or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. Medications such as blood thinners and aspirin, hormone replacement therapy, Intrauterine devices (IUDs), birth control pills and injectables. Pregnancy-related problems such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

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    • Women's Health
    • Pregnancy and Childbirth

    What is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    Dr. Carilyn Hoffman with Renown's Women's Health explains the symptoms, causes and treatments of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) (also referred to as Polycystic Ovarian Disease (PCOD)), a prevalent condition among women of reproductive age that influences hormonal balance, metabolism and fertility. Make an appointment with Renown Women's Health Click here to schedule Call to schedule: 775-982-5000 PCOS Defined PCOS is a constellation of symptoms characterized by two of the three criteria: multiple small cysts on the ovaries visible via ultrasound, irregular periods and signs of hyperandrogenism. Other symptoms include infertility, insulin resistance, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Symptoms of PCOS The symptoms of PCOS can vary from woman to woman, but some of the most common include: Irregular menstrual cycles: This is often one of the first signs of PCOS. Women may experience fewer than nine periods a year, more than 35 days between periods, frequent spotting, and/or abnormally heavy periods. Excess androgen levels: High levels of male hormones may result in physical signs such as excess facial and body hair (hirsutism), severe acne and male-pattern baldness. Polycystic ovaries: Enlarged ovaries containing numerous small cysts can be detected via ultrasound.     Causes and Risk Factors The exact cause of PCOS is unknown, but several factors may play a role: Genetic predisposition: A family history of PCOS increases the risk. Insulin resistance: High insulin levels might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation. Obesity: Women with elevated BMI’s are more likely to have PCOS, although 20% of women with PCOS are not obese. Diagnosis and Treatment Dr. Hoffman outlines that diagnosing PCOS requires a medical history review, a physical exam, blood work and an ultrasound to evaluate the ovaries. Treatment options can range from lifestyle modifications, like diet and exercise and weight loss, to medications for menstrual regulation, fertility assistance, and rarely surgery. Lifestyle Changes A healthy lifestyle is a cornerstone of managing PCOS. Regular exercise, a nutritious diet, and weight management can help reduce symptoms and the risk of long-term health issues. In overweight patients, weight loss as little as 5% has been shown to improve symptoms of PCOS. Medication Medications may include hormonal contraceptives to regulate menstrual cycles, anti-androgens to reduce hair growth and acne, and Metformin to address insulin resistance. Fertility Treatment For women with PCOS who are trying to conceive, ovulation induction with clomiphene or letrozole is sometimes necessary. Sometimes a referral to a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist is needed for more advanced technologies like IVF. Health Implications PCOS is not just about cystic ovaries or irregular periods; it can have profound implications on a woman's overall health. Women with PCOS are at an increased risk for several conditions, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and endometrial cancer.

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    • Cancer Care
    • Screening
    • Women's Health

    How Regular Cervical Cancer Screenings Can Save Lives

    According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 13,820 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed, and 4,360 women will die from cervical cancer. However, cervical cancer is preventable with regular screening tests and the HPV vaccine. It’s important to note that medical advances have allowed progress in diagnosing and treating cervical cancer. While it used to be one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women, the incidence of death has significantly declined. What to Know About the HPV Vaccine HPV vaccination is the best way to prevent cervical cancer and is recommended for all youth starting as early as age 9, or for teens and adults up to age 45 who didn’t start or finish the series. In Nevada, only 50.1% of teens ages 13-17 have been vaccinated for HPV.  There are 13 types of HPV, and the vaccine Gardasil 9 protects against 9 of those HPV strains, greatly reducing the incidence of cervical cancer among vaccinated individuals. What to Know About Cervical Cancer Screenings The CDC says the most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to have regular screening tests starting at age 21. And there are two common tests that can detect early stages of cervical cancer (or precancer) and improve health outcomes. The pap test (or pap smear). This screening looks for precancers. Women should begin getting pap smears when they’re 21. The human papillomavirus (HPV) test looks for the virus that can cause these cell changes. Cervical Cancer Screening Schedule The American Cancer Society offers the following guidelines for screenings: All women should begin cervical cancer screening at 21. Women between 21 and 29 should have a pap test every three years. Beginning at 30, the preferred way to screen is with a pap test combined with an HPV test every five years. This is called co-testing and should continue until age 65. A pap test (or pap smear) is performed during a regular screening appointment to look for precancers, cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not evaluated or appropriately treated. Typically outpatient procedures can reduce the risk of long-term health impacts that prevent pre-cancerous cells from becoming cancer cells. Women over 65 who have had regular screenings in the previous ten years should stop cervical cancer screening as long as they haven’t had any severe precancers found in the last 20 years. How to Get Screened Request an appointment with your primary care physician or OBGYN to schedule a screening.

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    • Primary Care
    • Women's Health

    The Essential Guide to Vitamin D: The Sunshine Vitamin

    Vitamin D, often hailed as the sunshine vitamin, plays a crucial role in our health by helping the body absorb calcium and promoting bone and teeth strength. However, despite its importance, Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, contributing to various health issues ranging from osteoporosis to type 2 diabetes. We asked Alexandra Westover, APRN for Renown Health, for more information. Understanding Vitamin D and Sun Exposure How Vitamin D is Synthesized Vitamin D functions like a pro-hormone produced when our skin is exposed to sunlight. It's vital for bone health and immune function and can even reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by 15%. Challenges in Vitamin D Synthesis Achieving adequate Vitamin D levels is more complex than basking in the sun. The vitamin breaks down quickly; during winter in northern latitudes, UVB rays are often too weak to contribute to its production. Expert Insight Alexandra shares, "Vitamin D deficiency is linked to multiple health concerns, including cancer and depression. Unfortunately, deficiency rates are high in the U.S., partly due to limited dietary sources and the increasing prevalence of obesity." Dietary Sources of Vitamin D Foods High in Vitamin D: Fatty fish like salmon and tuna Fortified milk and orange juices Mushrooms Eggs Cod Liver Oil Alexandra's Advice on Supplements "While foods and over-the-counter supplements can help, they often fail to correct deficiencies. Many individuals need prescription-strength doses of Vitamin D."

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    • Women's Health
    • Baby Health
    • Family
    • Parenting

    Building a Better Birth Team

    Giving birth expends as much energy as running a marathon. And just like you would only run a marathon with training beforehand, there are exercises you can do to prepare for birth. But instead of a coach, you'll have your birth team. Your birth team exists to help you navigate pregnancy and labor and support your choices. Let's say you've never put together a birth team before and are wondering where to start. Today we'll go over the three main positions to fill for your birth team's starting lineup. Birthing Person The birthing person is the leader of the team. After all, you can't have a birth team without someone giving birth. This person could be the baby's mother, gestational surrogate, birth parent before adoption, a transgender father or a non-binary parent. If you are not the birthing person, don't presume to know what the ideal labor and birth circumstances should be. And if you are the birthing person, don't allow anyone else to tell you what you want. This is your body and your birth; you are the boss in the birth room. Doula No birth team is complete without a doula, and although doulas have increased in popularity lately, many people still don't know what a doula is. Simply put, a doula is a birth professional – not a medical provider – who offers emotional, physical and informational support during pregnancy, labor and beyond. Most doulas' services include at least one prenatal visit and one postpartum visit, as well as continuous care throughout active labor. Some doulas provide more than one prenatal/postpartum visit, so be sure to ask what is included in their fee. Even if you have a partner who will support you during labor, studies have shown that a doula can significantly increase your likelihood of a positive birth outcome. Even the most supportive partner needs to rest, and a doula can ensure that you still get the care you need while your partner gets a break. Midwife or Obstetrician Finally, you'll want to choose the medical professional who will attend your birth. Many folks choose to give birth with the OB/GYN who does their annual check-ups, but there are many reasons someone might choose a different provider for their birth. The first step to finding the best attending provider for your birth is to decide which model of care aligns closest to your values and goals: the Midwifery Model of Care or the Medical Model of Care. .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{border-color:black;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px; overflow:hidden;padding:10px 5px;word-break:normal;} .tg th{border-color:black;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px; font-weight:normal;overflow:hidden;padding:10px 5px;word-break:normal;} .tg .tg-gqvw{background-color:#ffffff;color:#56266d;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;font-weight:bold; text-align:left;vertical-align:top} .tg .tg-8vim{background-color:#ffffff;color:#56266d;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;font-size:18px; font-weight:bold;text-align:left;vertical-align:top} .tg .tg-qm8j{background-color:#ffffff;color:#56266d;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;text-align:left; vertical-align:top} .tg {border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} .tg td{border-color:black;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px; overflow:hidden;padding:10px 5px;word-break:normal;} .tg th{border-color:black;border-style:solid;border-width:1px;font-family:Arial, sans-serif;font-size:14px; font-weight:normal;overflow:hidden;padding:10px 5px;word-break:normal;} .tg .tg-gqvw{background-color:#ffffff;color:#56266d;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;font-weight:bold; text-align:left;vertical-align:top} .tg .tg-8vim{background-color:#ffffff;color:#56266d;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;font-size:18px; font-weight:bold;text-align:left;vertical-align:top} .tg .tg-2rvk{background-color:#ffffff;color:#000000;font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif !important;text-align:left; vertical-align:top} Midwifery Model of Care Medical Model of Care Philosophy Birth is physiological. Birth is potentially pathological. Interventions Medical interventions can cause more complications, and therefore are only used as needed. Medical interventions should be used, even in non-emergency situations and sometimes as preventative measures. Decisions Birthing person is the key decision maker. Medical professional is the key decision maker. Provider’s Role Providers monitor labor and will intervene or transfer to hospital if needed. Providers assess and control the birthing process.

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    • Pediatric Care
    • Women's Health
    • Baby Health
    • Pregnancy and Childbirth

    Get Ready for Baby with Childbirth Classes

    By taking our pregnancy and birth class, you will gain the tools necessary to have a safe and empowering birth experience for both you and your baby. Chris Marlo, Childbirth Educator at Renown Health explains why birth classes are important. For questions regarding classes or tours, contact Chris Marlo: chris.marlo@renown.org 775-982-4352 What is a Certified Childbirth Educator/Doula? If you are expecting a baby, Renown has a wide variety of classes to help prepare you for birth. Classes are taught by certified childbirth educators and doulas. A certified childbirth educator is a trusted resource who has a passion for educating expecting parents about childbirth, and will provide you with non-biased, evidence-based information. A doula is a professional labor assistant who provides physical and emotional support during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum. As you prepare for birth, our certified educators will guide you each step of the way and ensure you receive the quality care you deserve.

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    • Pregnancy and Childbirth
    • Women's Health
    • Baby Health

    Remove the Guesswork with Renown’s Labor Assessment Area

    Pictured above: A section of Renown’s Labor Assessment Area.  When patients expecting a new child are about to give birth, nerves can be especially heightened. Questions flood their minds: Is the baby actually on the way? What’s going to happen next? Are we ready to push?   Lucky for them, at Renown Health, the guesswork can finally end with Renown’s Labor & Delivery unit Labor Assessment Area. This unique space is a triage area that helps make more precise labor diagnoses by determining exactly what stage expectant parents are at in the labor process.  Funded by a state grant more than a decade ago, the six-bed Labor Assessment Area sees 500-600 patients per month – from patients entering the unit directly, unsure if they are in active labor, to patients who are sent over from elsewhere experiencing labor symptoms, such as high blood pressure and water breaking. The area also serves as a pre-operation space for patients getting ready for procedures such as C-sections. The six cubicles that are enclosed with doors and curtains ensure each patient gets the private, one-on-one care they need. Furthermore, rather than sitting in a waiting room, this area allows expectant parents a comfortable place to prepare for labor.  “We are a unit that prides ourselves on getting patients into beds very quickly,” said Debbie Hawley, Associate Nurse Manager in Renown’s Labor & Delivery unit. “This area has allowed us to triage more effectively and allow more patients to collaborate with their provider in a quick manner.”

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